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THEY HAVE
SO MUCH
TO GIVE
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Donor A
01 / 03
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I’ve been a chef, a traveller, and am currently sitting a nursing degree. I’m well-mannered and level headed, which has served me well throughout life. I stay active and enjoy great walks, bike riding and swimming. I’m known for my warm smile and bright blue eyes.
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Donor B
02 / 03
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I’m a thoughtful, mindful person. I have a slim, fit build, with light brown skin and dark brown eyes. I think being a parent is one of the greatest things that can ever happen to somebody, and would be blessed to have the opportunity to help someone.
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Donor C
03 / 03
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I’m passionate about climate activism and work for an environmental NGO. I love to get out into the garden, and have a keen interest in videography. I’m a little under 6 feet tall, with wavy brown hair and blue eyes.
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They can pass on their best qualities.
But they can’t
pass on HIV.
Listen
This is 100% safe with effective treatment hiv cannot be transmitted
Dr. Mark Thomas
Infectious Disease Physician
  • With effective treatment, people living with HIV cannot transmit the virus - even through condomless sex. People are required to disclose their status to their sexual partners if condoms aren’t used.
  • With effective treatment, this virus can also not transmit from mother to child during pregnancy.
  • “There is no risk of passing it on to my children.”
    Mel is living with HIV, and she has given birth to two HIV negative children.
  • “HIV doesn’t stop me from having a fantastic love life.”
    Damien is living with HIV, and has been with his husband – who is HIV negative - for 16 years.
  • “Nobody should let HIV stop them from experiencing motherhood.”
    Becoming a mother has been the most rewarding experience in my life, but being HIV positive and becoming a mother makes you feel empowered and invincible. I first heard from my doctor that I could have children despite being HIV positive. When you find out there’s no risk of transmission, something changes in your thinking and acting. You feel brand new. You feel strong. You feel safe knowing you are no risk to others.

    - Emily
  • “We conceived her in the most unromantic way possible.”
    I’ve been with my husband, Aaron, for nearly 14 years. He is HIV negative. When we tried for our first child, I wasn’t receiving HIV treatment, so we conceived her in the most unromantic way – a $2 shop turkey baster and a spermicide free condom. When we decided to have a second child, I was on HIV treatment, and we were told it would be safe for Aaron if we didn’t use condoms. Our children are both happy, healthy and HIV negative.

    - Alice
  • “I live with the partner of my dreams.”
    I’ve lived with and loved the partner of my dreams for the last 15 years. We’re in a serodiscordant relationship, meaning my husband is HIV positive and I am not. This gives us a special opportunity. We can prove to others that living with HIV doesn’t mean living without love.

    - Shane
REAL STORIES
The science is real so are the stories
01 / 05
The science is real so are the stories
“There is no risk of passing it on to my children.”
Mel is living with HIV, and she has given birth to two HIV negative children.
  • “Since becoming a solo mum, HIV has become more of an issue for me. When I meet potential partners, I never know how they’ll react.”
    — Mel, 36, Hawkes Bay
  • “I’ve experienced a range of rejections, like ‘you shouldn’t be in this country infecting people’. Those words stay with you.”
    — Rodrigo, 36, Auckland
  • “I have faced fear and loathing as a trans woman with HIV. Nurses turning up with face shield and masks, gloves up to their armpits, gumboots and full-length aprons.”
    — Kjel, 40s, Upper Hutt
  • “I think the more we try and hide from our status, the more people will think we should hide.”
    — Jan, 70, Gore
  • “I am a mother of two children. I am living with HIV. My husband and children are not. We are a happy, healthy family!”
    — Judy, 42, New Plymouth
  • “The constant stigma, discrimination and lack of education. This is the hardest barrier and daily struggle I have to face.”
    — Mel, 36, Hawkes Bay
  • “You think to yourself, ‘I’ll be alone the rest of my life’, because no one is going to want to marry or have children with me.”
    — Rodrigo, 36, Auckland
  • “I have two sons, and I do everything any other mother would do with them. HIV is not something to be afraid of.”
    — Alyce, 35, Hawke’s Bay
  • “One day, when those who stigmatised us see the hurt their stigma has caused, I think their judgement will turn to regret.”
    — Jan, 70, Gore
  • “All we are looking for is a bit of love, but HIV is always in the way between you and love.”
    — Rodrigo, 36, Auckland
01 / 10
People living with hiv are still living with the stigma of hiv.
“Since becoming a solo mum, HIV has become more of an issue for me. When I meet potential partners, I never know how they’ll react.”
— Mel, 36, Hawkes Bay
for people living with hiv the stigma is worse than the virus.
You’ve seen the facts.
You’ve heard the stories.
It’s time to change our attitude.
By sharing this campaign with your friends and family,
you can help break the stigma.
  • What is Sperm Positive all about?
    Sperm Positive has been created to reduce the stigma and discrimination that people living with HIV still experience in many areas of their lives.

    By educating New Zealand that there is no risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex or childbirth when HIV is treated effectively, we aim to make a significant impact in all other areas that stigma still persists.

    Sperm Positive is also designed to raise awareness that fertility services are available and receptive to people living with HIV, a fact that is largely unknown. Sperm Positive will connect people with fertility services and donors to create life.
  • Do people living with HIV really still experience stigma?
    Yes - a 2018 survey conducted in New Zealand showed that:

    • 38% of New Zealanders would not be comfortable having a flatmate who is HIV positive
    • 42% of New Zealanders would not be comfortable having their food prepared by someone who is HIV positive
    • 46% of New Zealanders would not be comfortable letting their child play with a child who is HIV positive

    It’s important to note that none of the above scenarios have ever posed any risk of HIV transmission. Even in the 80s and 90s when the AIDS epidemic was at its peak, the only significant risk of transmission came from unprotected sex with a detectable viral load, or needle-sharing. Thirty years later, many New Zealanders are still incredibly uneducated about HIV transmission risk and people living with HIV have to deal with the consequences of that.
  • How can you be sure the donors can’t pass on HIV?
    The Swiss Statement, published 11 years ago, stated that people living with HIV on effective treatment cannot sexually transmit HIV – this is known as Undetectable = Untransmittable or U=U. Since then two other studies, PARTNER 1 & PARTNER 2, supported by UNAIDS and World Health Organisation, have reported no cases of HIV transmission in over 126,000 cases of condomless sex between people living with HIV and their HIV-negative partners.

    In New Zealand, people are required to disclose their status to their sexual partners if condoms aren’t used.
  • What does Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) mean?
    An undetectable viral load means that the amount (load) of HIV in a person’s blood is so low that the virus cannot be measured (detected) by standard methods. This means that the treatment is effective and working well for them – it does not mean the HIV has been cured.

    Essentially U=U means - when the virus is undetectable, it cannot be sexually transmitted so is "untransmittable".
  • Is this a real sperm bank?
    Sperm Positive itself will not be undertaking any medical or fertility related activities. If people are interested in exploring the option of receiving a sperm donation, we will try to match them with a donor. If the donor agrees with the match, and both parties would like to proceed, we will put them in touch with local fertility clinics.
  • Do you accept new donors?
    Yes, anyone living with HIV can apply by following the “Become a donor” links. Note that donors need to be 45 years of age or less, as sperm quality has been shown to decline as men get older. If accepted and an interested recipient is found, both parties will be passed across to local fertility clinics who will manage the next steps of the process.
  • Don’t you need a licence for this?
    Sperm Positive is designed to raise awareness of the stigma around HIV in New Zealand. The sperm bank will not be operating as a fertility clinic in any way, but has confirmed that several local fertility clinics are able to support people living with HIV to utilise their services. Any interested parties will be referred to the professionals there to proceed with treatment, should they wish to do so.
  • What are the steps that must be taken to achieve an undetectable viral load?
    People living with HIV take antiretroviral medication daily to control the virus. Depending on the drugs employed it may take six months for the viral load to become undetectable. Continued and reliable HIV suppression requires selection of appropriate agents and excellent adherence to treatment. HIV viral suppression is regularly monitored to assure both personal health and public health benefits. Two undetectable viral load measurements, at least one month apart, will be achieved before initiating the sperm donation process.
  • Does this mean that someone can’t pass HIV in any way?
    The current studies have been limited to the sexual transmission of HIV (i.e via partner-to-partner or reproduction/childbirth). While the statement may be applicable to other modes of transmission have not been studied as yet and are not included in the statement. Sperm Positive is focussed on conception and is covered by the research.
  • Are there any cases when even though someone has an undetectable viral load, they have still passed on HIV?
    Not sexually. From the World Health Organization: “there is no evidence that individuals who have successfully achieved and maintained viral suppression through ART transmit the virus sexually to their HIV-negative partner(s)”.
  • Can people not on treatment still pass on the virus?
    If someone has a detectable viral load it is possible to pass on HIV and risk can be managed with prevention tools such as condoms, clean needles and other precautions. Another technique is for the HIV negative partner to take a prevention pill called PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) which prevents the acquisition of HIV. This is similar to the contraceptive pill, but for the prevention of HIV.
Sperm Positive has been created to reduce the stigma and discrimination that people living with HIV still experience in many areas of their lives.

By educating New Zealand that there is no risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex or childbirth when HIV is treated effectively, we aim to make a significant impact in all other areas that stigma still persists.

Sperm Positive is also designed to raise awareness that fertility services are available and receptive to people living with HIV, a fact that is largely unknown. Sperm Positive will connect people with fertility services and donors to create life.
Become a donor
Becoming a sperm donor is your chance to give some of your best qualities and help someone else realise their dream of starting a family. If you’re interested in taking the first step towards becoming an HIV positive sperm donor, please get in touch.
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Find a donor
Our donors have so much to give, but they can’t give you HIV. If you’re interested in taking the first step towards finding an HIV positive sperm donor, please get in touch.
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Get support
Living with HIV shouldn’t be a barrier to living a full, healthy life. If you are in any way affected by HIV and would like support or details about how we can help, please get in touch.
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Tell your story
We’ve shared a handful of real stories about people’s experience of living with HIV and would love to hear more. If you would like to share your story about living with HIV, or your experiences in trying to start a family, please get in touch.
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